Nutrition Recipes Snacks

RECIPE: Raspberry Oat Bars

Raspberries and oats are naturally high in fiber and antioxidants, and they pair well together in these easy to make dessert bars. Made with whole wheat flour and real ingredients, you won’t believe these are actually good for you!

RECIPE: Raspberry Oat Bars
Raspberries and oats are naturally high in fiber and antioxidants, and they pair well together in these easy to make dessert bars. Made with whole wheat flour and real ingredients, you won’t believe these are actually good for you!
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Ingredients
  1. 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
  2. 1 1/2 cups rolled oats
  3. 1/2 cup brown sugar
  4. 1 teaspoon baking powder
  5. 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  6. 1 cup coconut oil, melted
  7. 1/2 cup 100 percent fruit raspberry jam
Instructions
  1. 1.Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. 2.Combine the flour, oats, sugar, baking powder and salt in a bowl. Stir in the coconut oil. Spread half of the mixture in a 9×9 baking dish. Top the mixture with the jam, and then put the remaining oat mixture on top.
  3. 3.Bake for 30 minutes, until tops are browned. Allow to cool completely before cutting and serving.
Notes
  1. Calories: 235 Fat: 14.2 Saturated fat: 11.9 Trans fat: 0 Carbohydrates: 25.8 Sugar: 116 Sodium: 59 Fiber: 1.1 Protein: 2.2 Cholesterol: 0
Some of the health benefits of Raspberries
  1. Raspberries are low in calories and saturated fats but are a good source of dietary fiber and antioxidants. 100 g berries contain just 52 calories but provide 6.5 g of fiber.
  2. Raspberries have high levels of phenolic flavonoid phytochemicals. Scientific studies show that these antioxidant compounds in these berries have potential health benefits against cancer, aging, inflammation, and neuro-degenerative diseases.
  3. Xylitol is a low-calorie sugar substitute extracted from raspberries. A teaspoonful of xylitol contains just 9.5 calories, compare that to sugar, which has 15 calories. Xylitol absorbs more slowly in the intestines than sugar and does not contribute to high glycemic index, meaning it can be helpful to diabetics.
  4. Fresh raspberries are an excellent source of vitamin-C. A powerful natural antioxidant. 100 g berries provide 26.1 mg or about 46% of DRI of vitamin C. Consumption of fruits rich in vitamin C helps the body develop resistance against infectious agents, counter inflammation, and harmful free radicals.
  5. Raspberry contains anti-oxidant vitamins like vitamin A, and vitamin E. These antioxidants play a role in anti-aging and various disease processes.
  6. Raspberry has an ORAC value (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) of about 4900 per 100 grams, making it among the top-ranked ORAC fruits.
  7. Raspberries contain a good amount of minerals like potassium, manganese, copper, iron and magnesium. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese is used by the body as a co-factor for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase. Copper is required in the production of red blood cells.
  8. Raspberries are rich in B-complex group of vitamins and vitamin K. The berries contain high levels of vitamin B-6, niacin, riboflavin, and folic acid. These vitamins function as co-factors and help the body in the metabolism of carbohydrates, protein and fats.
Viance Nutrition http://blog.viance.com/

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Viance Nutrition

Hi! I'm Walt Landi the founder and CEO of Viance Nutrition. Welcome to our Blog. I maintain this Blog as a free resource for anyone wishing to improve their health. Your comments and feedback are always welcomed and you can email me direct at walt@viance.com if you have any suggestions. Thanks. Ps. Spread the word and check out our products at viance.com. :)

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